Knochelmann accused of political favoritism
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September 3, 2017
Knochelmann accused of political favoritism after
new 911 tax deal



Former Kenton County CEO Steve Arlinghaus is accusing the current Judge Executive of political favoritism after he reworked the tax structure to pay for 911 operations.

Arlinghaus says Kenton County Judge Executive Kris Knochelmann's new 911 tax structure was created to give a "very favorable deal to some of (Knochelmann) friends with large apartment complexes."

And Arlinghaus also accused the current Judge Executive of giving himself a sweetheart deal.

"My 911 fee bill jumps from $360 to $1,650 annually, yet I noticed you measured the size of your office building nice and conveniently so it got capped at $435.

"If you even pay that! That's what you call equitable? Sweet deal for you and a select group of your friends!," Arlinghaus ripped in a post on Facebook.

Recently, Judge Executive Knochelmann and the county commission voted on and passed a new tax structure to pay for 911 operations.





According to Gannett Media, the 911 tax structure is now divided into three land use density groups:

  • Commercial large retail (building over 25,000 square feet) will pay a flat $2,630 fee;
  • Commercial small retail (building under 25,000 square feet) will pay a flat $435 fee;
  • Commercial non-retail (all other non-exempt) will pay a flat $530 fee.

    For single-, two- and three-family structures the fee is $75 per unit. Apartment complexes of four to 39 units are $75 per unit, capped at $500 total per parcel.

    Apartment complexes with 40-plus units have a $75 per unit fee, capped at $6,765 total per parcel.

    The tax, often called a 'fee', will be on next year's bill for all Kenton County unincorporated areas and cities except Erlanger, Elsmere and Crescent Springs, Gannett Media notes, using information supplied by the county government.

    Once those cities merge with the county's dispatch center they will be involved.

    Judge Executive Knochelmann says the new 911 tax distribution is "the most equitable and fair way" to go.

    Previously, the tax -- charged to residents and businesses to support emergency response operations -- was an even $60 per parcel. Now the yearly fee is based on call usage and land use density.